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Nagaland

Glouthera fragrantisima locally known as Khwono is the origin of the name Khonoma. Approximately 20kms South west of Kohima, the capital of Nagaland sits this pretty village of Khonoma. The Angami settlers for over 400 years also refer to Khonoma as Khwunoria. Their conservation activities was motivated by some of the village elders. A number of villagers were opposed to the idea, since hunting was so much a part of their culture. But over the next 3 years, through extensive lobbying in the village, the majority were convinced.
In the mid-1990s the villagers physically resisted timber merchants from carry out logging, aided by some insiders. Over the last decade Khonoma, has establishing systems of natural resource management, village administration, and appropriate development…all coupled with a resolute will to conserve biodiversity and wildlife.

In 1998, the Khonoma Village Council notified 70sq km as a Khonoma Nature Conservation and Tragopan Sanctuary (KNCTS). The Sanctuary’s foundation stone was laid in December 1998; it was also decided to ban hunting in the entire village, not only the Sanctuary area. The village sits in an arena with terraced crop fields in the valley and lush green mountains surrounding it. There was bird life everywhere. Calls of Hill partridge and Great Barbets resonate in the valley. Birds to be seen easily are Black Bulbuls, Grey Sibias, Rusty-capped Fulvetta, Large Niltavas, Red-faced Liochiclas, Short-billed Minivets, Great Barbets,
Some of the interesting birds encountered were Black Eagle, Common Buzzard, Common Rosefinch, Fire-tailed Sunbird and Crested Finchbill and Mountain Bamboo Partridge.

The village sits in an arena with terraced crop fields in the valley and lush green mountains surrounding it. There was bird life everywhere. Calls of Hill partridge and Great Barbets resonate in the valley. Birds to be seen easily are Black Bulbuls, Grey Sibias, Rusty-capped Fulvetta, Large Niltavas, Red-faced Liochiclas, Short-billed Minivets, Great Barbets.

Some of the interesting birds encountered were Black Eagle, Common Buzzard, Common Rosefinch, Fire-tailed Sunbird and Crested Finchbill and Mountain Bamboo Partridge.

The area included in the KNCTS is of great value, from a biodiversity, water security, and aesthetic point of view. It comprises of exquisite broad-leaved forests and dwarf bamboo grasslands. It is part of the Dzuku valley, which is home to a good population of the state bird, the Blyth’s Tragopan. Dzuku and surrounding forests also contain other wildlife, like Himalayan black bear, Serow, Sambar, Leopard, Barking Deer (which ventures into the village in the evenings) over 40 species of orchids and the endemic Dzuku lily, etc.

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